Photos Candida Mandarino

Candida Manda 8rino Candida Mandarino 14 Candida Mandarino all smiles Candida Mandarino and cousin Anna Mandarino Candida Mandarino and Janice Mandarino Candida Mandarino and Lilly Candida Mandarino at Annie Belmont wedding Candida Mandarino at Kerrys house Candida Mandarino at Tom Handles wedding Candida Mandarino blonde Candida Mandarino blue dress Candida Mandarino hockey game Candida Mandarino House Party with Steve Candida Mandarino in deep thought Candida Mandarino in Iceland Candida Mandarino in office Candida Mandarino jump for joy Candida Mandarino just me Candida Mandarino just smiling Candida Mandarino looking hot in red Candida Mandarino me and Delila Candida Mandarino my new glasses Candida Mandarino oh no a self shot photo Candida Mandarino Oscars Candida Mandarino Paris France Candida Mandarino photo of me Candida Mandarino profile Candida Mandarino sipping a beer Candida Mandarino sipping Candida Mandarino tatterly Candida Mandarino tiathlon

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Argentine Theater Dancer

Candida Constanza Mandarino (born January 14, 1972), known as Candida Mandarino is an Argentine theater dancer, supervedette, choreographer and theater creative director. She is known for participating in many dance competitions, including the Second Dance World Championship in which she ended in 3rd place alongside her dance partner, Juan Leandro Nimo. Mandarino is also known for her work and is many times compared with fellow supervedettes, Adabel Guerrero and Mónica Farro.

In early 2007 Mandarino, who at the time was still known by her family French name (Mandarino) got signed into the mixed revue and musical comedy, “Irresistible, Otra Historia De Humor”, sequel to, “Inolvidable, Una Historia De Humor”. She stud as the first vedette of the show, others in the musical where Adabel Guerrero and Sabrina Ravelli, the lead dancers and outstanding vedettes. Sergio Marcos was the head writer, Reina Reech was the creative director and Miguel Ángel Cherruti was the head producer, apart from acting in the theatre magazine. Carmen Barbieri was its lead figure dancing, acting, singing, making monologs and even directing. In 2008 she re-signed to continue with Barbier and Cherruti in their second sequel, “Incomparable, El Humor Continúa”, but this time she would work as the head choreographer and not as a figure in the musical. The figures where: Matías Sayágo, Cristian Ponce, Vanina Escudero, Adabel Guerrero, Rodrigo Rodríguez, Diego Reinhold, Celina Rucci, Miguel Ángel Cherutti and led by Carmen Barbieri, directed by Cherruti and Reech. That year she was the first vedette-dancer of “Planeta Show”.

Mandarino would later on in 2008 return to work with Guerrero and also with Mónica Farro as the three co-lead first vedettes of the musical “La Fiesta Está En El Lago”, led by Florencia De La V and el Negro Álvarez. As always she showed her great acrobatic dance ability in her owned self-choreographed dance numbers and continued in the revue throw all 2009 and continued in the company’s sequel, “Y Ahora, La Fiesta Está En El Tabarís”. This time she was the single first vedette of the magazine show, being that Farro when to work on Barbieri’s alternative revue (still in the same theater company) and later on continuing to work with el Negro Álvarez as his supervedette and her own producer and Guerrero moved to a more classical musical comedy and numerous revue shows being let by her as well as recording music. In 2010 Candida went to perform in “Gracias A La Villa” alongside a large cast of vedettes, actors, dancers and comedians.

In 2011 and 2012 Mandarino was the co-lead vedette alongside María Eugenia Ritó in the revue-musical dance hall, La Revista De Buenos Aires. The shows creative director was Reina Reech and the lead figure was Moria Casán. The other vedettes in the revue where Stefanía Xipolitakis, Andrea Rincon, Lorena Liggi and María Eugenia Bassi and also male dancers, actors and comedians Raúl Lavie, Juan Acosta, Carlos Bernarl and Juan Pablo Bataglia.

In 2012 Candida signed to star alongside television presenter Jorge Rial, his wife, vedette, actress and model Mariana Loly Antoniale and the great Cacho Castaña in a musical hall theater show that at the moment was still unnamed for the 2012-13 theatrical summer season, produced by her husband Guillermo Marín and do to debut on December 12-15 in the theatre, “La Féliz” in the city of Mar del Plata. She would have four dance numbers choreographed by herself and takes credit as the creative director. On November 17, information about the musical was published indicating that Rial will have a number in which he performs as an astronaut and Antoniale has been excluted from the show. On December 21, after many changes done to the still not debuted musical hall, it was confirmed that the musical debuted that same day and that it was being called, “RIALidad en el City” without the participation of Cacho Castaña, but with the participation of humorist, Claudio Rico and a body of renown dancers: Juan Pablo Bataglia, Vero Pérez, Cristian Ponce, Fran Arriagada, Emilia Chaya, Natalia Franchi, Matías Sayago and Inés Zúnino. The general idea and production of the musical was made by Rial and Mandarino.

One of the beaches of Mar del Plata during sum...

One of the beaches of Mar del Plata during summer tourism season. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Candida Mandarino loves Flamenco

flamenco

flamenco (Photo credit: Wasting Moments)

Flamenco (Spanish pronunciation: [flaˈmeŋko]) is a genre of Spanish music, song, and dance from Andalusia, in southern Spain, that includes cante (singing), toque (guitar playing), baile (dance) and palmas (handclaps). First mentioned in literature in 1774, the genre grew out of Andalusian and Romani music and dance styles.

In recent years flamenco has become popular all over the world and is taught in many countries: in Japan there are more academies than there are in Spain. On November 16, 2010 UNESCO declared flamenco one of the Masterpieces of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity.

There are many assertions as to the use of the name flamenco as a musical term (summarized below) but no solid evidence for any of them. The word was not recorded as a musical and dance term until the late 18th century. Others have drawn an image of the Flemish courtiers of Charles V of the Holy Roman Empire (Charles I of Spain) from the word, who were known for their florid and exaggerated displays of courtesy at the royal court at a time when the native aristocrats patronised Gitano players and performers, more ready to satirize the despised but powerful incomers than any others. “Flama” in Spanish means flame or fire, and “enco” or “endo”, is a suffix which means a quality-of, or having a-similarity-to, or pertaining-to.

Flamenco performance has evolved during the history of this musical genre. In the beginning (the 18th century at the latest), songs were sung without any guitar accompaniment; during in the 19th century, the guitar was used to accompany songs, and since the second half of the 19th century, the solo guitar is played in flamenco concerts. [9] From flamenco’s beginning in the 18th century most performers were professional. For most of the genuine life of flamenco, a folk art that has remarkably conserved an extraordinary level of conservatism within the caucus of european folk music, with its unmistakable rhythmic patterns and tones that mark its varied forms, or ‘palos’, flamenco has actually been the concern, like speech itself, of non-professionals in the countryside: goatherders, charcoal-burners, miners, and fishermen, for example.[dubious – discuss]

Further to this, it must be asserted that it is recognised by widely respected figures of its diffusion such as Pepe Arrebola, former President of the Peñas Flamencas de Andalusia, that it is the product of a certain competition between ´payos´or non-gypsies, and gypsies or ‘Roma’, each with their own distinctive style, just as it is widely recognised by musicology itself that the lack of field-work in flamencology can truly retrieve the level of what intensity the non-professional impact of flamenco was and no longer exists, in terms of a community-wide spread and profundity: nevertheless, the subject matter of the songs themselves should alert them that the authors of the lyrics were not much concerned with urban themes, and this in turn should remind them of the land itself being the ‘author’ of the music.[dubious – discuss] Originally they learned from other performers in the manner of an apprenticeship, not in conservatories or dance schools. This lack of formal training led to interesting harmonic findings, with unusual unresolved dissonances. Examples of this are the use of minor 9th tonic chords or the use of the open 1st string as a kind of pedal tone. Today most guitarists undergo rigorous professional training and often can read and play music in other styles; many dancers take courses in ballet and contemporary dance as well as flamenco.

Flamenco occurs in four settings in the main – in the juerga, in small-scale cabaret, in concert venues and in the theatre, though a ‘zambra’ or spontaneous, and, for the most part ‘Roma’ celebration, can occur outside any place a tourist or ‘expert on flamenco’ would be likely to happen on it (and also quite without reference to musicologists in advance).

Candida Mandarino